Find out 5 mistakes that can harm your skin during the joy of festivals

By Skin & Hair Academy  |   November 24, 2015

Festive season is all about lights, fireworks, shopping and partying. Everyone we see seems to be in a happy mood, decked in jewellery and wearing expensive clothes. But in the midst of all the joy and get-togethers, we often forget about skincare during festivals. There are certain mistakes that most people make while being busy with festive celebrations.

Here are five such mistakes that we could try to avoid making with skincare during this festive season:

1. Applying too much make-up:

During the festive season, everyone wants to look their best. When we get ready for celebrations or get-togethers, we wear our best clothes, and spruce ourselves up with too much make-up. Using chemical-based make-up products is definitely harmful for the skin.[1]You might also be using harsh chemicals, hair products and procedures to flaunt the hair styles of your dreams. Though these are common during the festive season, we should use natural ingredient-based products as far as possible, and avoid hair treatments that involve applying heat. Last but not the least -- never go to bed with your make up on, no matter how tired you are after the party.

2. Eating unhealthy:

The best thing about festivals is the tasty food and treats, spruced with lots of sweets, chocolates and other rich delicacies. Everyone loves such food, but it can significantly affect your skin and hair health. Too much sugar and salt can negatively impact your body, which has a direct debilitating effect on the health and look of your skin and hair. So, it is important to watch what you are eating during the festive season.

3. Prolonged exposure to sun:

We do a lot of shopping during the festive season. If you are not an online shopping geek, you will spend a lot of time outdoors in the markets. You will be going in and out of air-conditioned showrooms many times, which can actually damage your skin and hair. So, before going out, apply a sunscreen of at least SPF 15 on your face, hands and other exposed areas of your skin.[2]For hair, it is best to wear a scarf or hat. Wear long-sleeved dresses as far as possible, and don’t forget your sunglasses to prevent dark circles.

4. Exposure to heat and lights:

The lighting around you and the heat from fireworks and crackers will cause a lot of damage to your skin and hair. While you can’t avoid the lighting and heat during this season, you can keep yourself away from direct sources of heat and light, such as fireworks, lamps and lights. Exercise caution while lighting lamps, and if you accidentally burn your skin, apply first aid and let it heal. If it is serious, rush to a nearby doctor immediately.

5. Ignoring dryness of skin and hair:

The air will be enveloped with thick smoke during festival days. This smoke is harmful not only for your lungs, but also for your skin and hair. It causes a lot of dryness, which can eventually affect your skin and hair health. In addition, environmental pollution can also lead to skin aging. So, here are some Holi skin care tips and some more skin care tips for Diwali![3] Avoid going out in smoke-filled areas. Keep your doors and windows closed. And keep your hair and skin moisturised.

Enjoying the festive season is essential, but skin and hair care should be an important part of your everyday routine. Follow our festival skincare tips and avoiding these five mistakes for a joyous festive season!

References:

[1] Chemical Exposures: The Ugly Side of Beauty Products. 2015. Chemical Exposures: The Ugly Side of Beauty Products. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1253722/. [Accessed 18 November 2015].

[2] Sunscreening Agents. 2015. Sunscreening Agents. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3543289/. [Accessed 18 November 2015].

[3] Environmental influences on skin aging and ethnic-specific manifestations. 2015. Environmental influences on skin aging and ethnic-specific manifestations. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3583881/. [Accessed 18 November 2015].


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